Loading…

This year, the International Development Conference will highlight the theoretical development studies and policy research that play a predominant role in shaping development projects. When concrete, tangible policies and projects are implemented, theory and practice often fail to coincide. Development solutions and initiatives, as well as daily livelihood decisions, executed by an array of actors - from large development players to individual households - affect the lives of citizens and underdeveloped areas throughout the world. As such, critical reflections on ongoing development efforts, common consumption decisions and ingrained aspects of the world economy highlight that, while considerable victories have been attained to achieve a more just, prosperous and equitable world, attempts at reforms and aids are not without their drawbacks. 

The controversy surrounding the involvement of religious aid organizations may politicize and undermine efforts to eliminate poverty and obtain relief. Attempts to regulate small scale gold mining, while environmentally necessary, may fail to address the dilemma of gold demand in shaping the persistence of artisans gold mining. Efforts to democratize and increase the transparency of the international trade regime may succeed in incorporating sustainability as a core principal of global commerce, but tedious institutional reform may not reflect the urgency of climate change. Alongside the IDC 2017’s thematic discussions, which will explore these and more concrete development efforts through a critical lens, the conference will also host a selection of Canadian NGOs, businesses, and student researchers to showcase the diversity and innovation of new ideas and efforts shaping the development sectors today. 

 

Sign up or log in to bookmark your favorites and sync them to your phone or calendar.

Saturday, February 11
 

08:30

Breakfast and Registration
Check back soon for details! 

Saturday February 11, 2017 08:30 - 09:15
Social Sciences Building (MW Atrium)

09:15

Opening Keynote by Kerry Max

Kerry Max has over twenty years of public and private sector experience in international development policy and programming, including in private sector development, trade, investment, development finance and project management.

Kerry is currently Deputy Director for Development Research and Engagement in Global Affairs Canada.  His previous government roles include Head of Aid to Nicaragua, Team Lead for private sector development specialists, and Lead Economist for the Americas.  Kerry recently returned from two years as Director of Inclusive Financial Services for MEDA.

Kerry has an M. Phil. in Economics from Oxford University, and an honours BA in International Development (Political Economy and Physical and Ecological Resource Management), from the University of Toronto.

Kerry has worked in: Antigua, Barbados, Benin, Bolivia, Brazil, Costa Rica, Cuba, El Salvador, Jamaica, Ghana, Guatemala, Guyana, Honduras, Indonesia, Kenya, Nicaragua, Peru, Sri Lanka, St. Lucia, Tanzania, Trinidad and Tobago, Uganda, Yemen and Zimbabwe.




Saturday February 11, 2017 09:15 - 10:15
MW 170

10:15

Buying Justice: Exploring Fair Trade and the Meaning Behind the Mark
As one brand or another, we have all seen Fair Trade at some point in our lives. Whether it marks our favourite coffee, artisanal handicrafts at retail outlets, or fresh produce at our super markets, Fair Trade is readily available for our purchase. However, the actual meaning of the Fair Trade logo may be as diverse as the products it labels. Fair Trade producer cooperatives, institutions, businesses, and consumers each have unique frameworks of understanding, applying, and maintaining the integrity of the Fair Trade mark. For us as consumers of these products, it is worth our time to explore the diversity of meaning behind the Fair Trade mark and different ways of interpreting and incorporating fair practices into business. So, in honour of UTSC being certified as  Canada’s 15th Fair Trade Campus by Fair Trade Canada, the IDC 2017 will set out to explore the complexities of ‘fairness’ and Fair Trade. Together, with a host of Toronto businesses, academics, and Canadian Fair Trade representatives we will explore the diversity of meanings behind Fair Trade, the applicability of it as a business model in Toronto, and what ‘fair’ means to us as everyday consumers.

Speakers
avatar for JOSE ABAD-PUELLES

JOSE ABAD-PUELLES

Jose Abad-Puelles was formerly the Category and Supply Chain Specialist for Coffee at Fairtrade Canada and now presently serves as the Coffee Account Manager for Canada. Jose was raised in a small farm in Northern Peru; there, he experienced all the challenges and struggles that small... Read More →
NH

NADIA HARDUAR

Nadia Harduar is the Sustainability Project Coordinator at the University of Toronto Scarborough with a Master of Environmental Science Degree. She is the Chair of the Sustainability Food User Sub Committee and worked alongside the Business Development Office and SCSU over the last... Read More →
avatar for DR. DARRYL REED

DR. DARRYL REED

Darryl Reed is Associate Professor in the Division of Social Science at York University and teaches in the Business & Society Program. He has a PhD in political economy and public policy (University of Southern California, Los Angeles, ’95) and a PhD in social ethics (University... Read More →
avatar for DEREK ZAVISLAKE

DEREK ZAVISLAKE

Derek Zavislake, co-founder of Merchants of Green Coffee with his brother Brad, is obsessed with delivering the freshest cup of coffee possible. The 20-year-old Toronto company imports and markets premium unroasted coffee beans from farmers around the world for consumers and some... Read More →



Saturday February 11, 2017 10:15 - 12:15
MW 120

10:15

Saviour Complex: Navigating Religion's Messy History and Current Role in Development
Religious institutions have a messy and complicated history in development. Today, many development practitioners and institutions continue to be based in religion - but not without tension.  Churches, mosques and other religious institutions are often the best positioned to know a community’s needs and respond accordingly. Local religious groups have the respect and recognition in the community that other development organizations spend years and even decades trying to achieve. Yet religious development organizations can also find themselves in a difficult tension between development and religion when the two seem to be in opposition, causing many to throw religion out of development practice indefinitely. Where does religion sit within the field of development? When does it act as a barrier, when is it the only open door to lifting people out of poverty, and how do development practitioners navigate between the two?

Speakers
JF

JESSICA FERNE

Director of Programs, International Development and Relief Foundation
DK

DR.DAVID KUPP

Program Coordinator, Master of Theological Studies in Development | Professor, Wycliffe CollegeDavid has been teaching courses at Wycliffe College since 2009, and is Director of the Urban and International Development program. He is also senior partner at Kabisa International and... Read More →
DM

DR.KATHERINE MARSHALL

Katherine Marshall is a senior fellow at the Berkley Center for Religion, Peace, and World Affairs, where she leads the Center's program on Religion and Global Development, and Professor of the Practice of Development, Conflict, and Religion at Georgetown University. After a long... Read More →
JC

JOSE CARLOS PREM

Country Director, Compassion Guatemala



Saturday February 11, 2017 10:15 - 12:15
MW 140

10:15

The Fist and the Gavel: Legal and Political Routes for the Advancement of Human Rights
Since the Second World War, international human rights have been codified into treaties that are nearly universally ratified. Regional courts and other international institutions have emerged to interpret and attempt to enforce these treaties. Despite these structures and laws, widely recognized civil and political human rights continue to be violated throughout the world, and social, cultural and economic rights remain unenforced. As an alternative, political mobilization has taken precedence as the tool to defend and enhance fundamental rights throughout the world, calling into question the efficacy of the human rights regime as an avenue for development. In The Fist and Gavel, the IDC 2017 will compare and contrast political mobilization and legal tactics as means to development with a focus on how local students may engage in these levels to defend the human right to development abroad.

Moderators
Speakers
FD

FANTA DIABY

Fanta was born in Guinea but raised a little bit everywhere. Before moving to Canada, she had visited a number of African countries and lived a little bit of a transient childhood living in Guinea, Rwanda, Tanzania and Ghana. As a result, Fanta gained an interest in conflict and development... Read More →
PT

PHILIPPE TREMBLAY

Philippe Tremblay is a Senior Legal Advisor at Lawyers without Borders Canada (LWBC). Prior to holding this position, he served LWBC first as Colombia Program Officer and then Legal Director. Before joining LWBC, Philippe Tremblay worked for the Geneva-based Association for the Prevention... Read More →
CW

CORY WANLESS

Cory Wanless is a lawyer at Klippensteins Barristers and Solicitors in Toronto. Cory represents clients nationally and internationally in the areas of corporate accountability, First Nations rights, environmental law, defamation and affordable housing.Along with Murray Klippenstein... Read More →
SW

SARAH WEINBERGER

Sarah is a JD candidate at Osgoode Hall Law School, a senior editor of the Journal of Law and Social Policy, and a researcher with the Justice and Corporate Accountability Project (JCAP). She holds a BA in Indigenous Studies & Hispanic Studies from Trent University, and has studied... Read More →



Saturday February 11, 2017 10:15 - 12:15
MW 160

12:15

Lunch
Delicious food will be served!

Saturday February 11, 2017 12:15 - 14:15
MW Atrium

12:15

Student Poster Fair
The International Development Conference 2017 is accepting submissions for this year's student research poster fair to showcase the research interests and experiences of undergraduate students. Students will be given the chance to develop and present a research poster to showcase their recent research in the fileds of international development and the social sciences, environmental sciences, economics, political sciences, and more! 

Prizes: Cash prizes of $250, $100 and $50 will be awarded and a free ticket to the IDC 2017.


More Details: http://www.utoronto-idc.org/get-involved.
 



Saturday February 11, 2017 12:15 - 14:15
MW Atrium

14:15

Feature Film: RUNNING ON EMPTY
RUNNING ON EMPTY is the story of a natural disaster and how Californians are responding as they face a water level that is dropping to zero. Suddenly, hard questions are being asked. Where did all the water go?  Who's fault is it? And what needs to change to save California from itself? RUNNING ON EMPTY, and its host Canadian scientist Nick Eyles, take a road trip to examine how California drained its oasis dry and ignored decades of accepted water wisdom. Now, the state is facing a stark, new reality - there simply isn’t enough water to go around.

Speakers
DE

DR.NICK EYLES

Nick Eyles P. Geo holds a Ph.D (East Anglia) and D.Sc. (Leicester) and is Professor of Geology at the University of Toronto Scarborough (UTSC) where he has taught for more than 33 years. His prime research interest is in glacial sedimentology and has over 30 years’ experience of... Read More →


Saturday February 11, 2017 14:15 - 14:45
MW 120

14:15

Ethical Photography
A Developing Story: Exploring Responsible Journalism : With a particular focus on the field of international development and humanitarian work, this gallery will explore journalistic framing of historical events, world issues, culture, and the lives of people around the world. The goal of the workshop is to raise questions and foster discussion about how topics like poverty, civil war, and diaspora are presented in mainstream media and how their portrayal influences the way we think about such issues.


Saturday February 11, 2017 14:15 - 15:45
MW 264

14:15

Social Innovation
Social Innovation is a growing field that applies creative and sustainable solutions to pressing social problems. Within this workshop you will have the opportunity to connect and engage with groups in the Toronto area who are currently working on social innovation projects and entrepreneurship. Join us in listening to the insight and advice that these exciting professionals have to share, and learn more about the innovative projects that are being implemented in Toronto.

Speakers
KV

KEVIN VUONG

@VuongKevinKevin Vuong is the Executive Director of the Agency for Public and Social Innovation. He is a connector, city-builder, and military officer working to build a stronger, more resilient and prosperous Canada where no one is left behind.For his work as a community leader... Read More →


Saturday February 11, 2017 14:15 - 15:45
TBA

14:15

Activism 101
From staging protests and rallies to creating petitions and writing letters, attendees will analyze Amnesty International’s work centered around various human rights, politics and justice related issues. Using the Al’s Child Labour: Not in my phone! Campaign as an example, this workshop seeks to explore effective advocacy and will become a starting point for future policy makers, business leaders and activists alike.

Speakers
AI

AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL

BRIDGING THEORY AND PRACTICETHEMATIC DISCUSSIONSSPEAKERSWORKSHOPSSCHEDULEHIGH SCHOOL STUDENTSWORKSHOPS Activism 101 with Amnesty InternationalFrom staging protests and rallies to creating petitions and writing letters, attendees will analyze Amnesty International’s work centered... Read More →


Saturday February 11, 2017 14:15 - 15:45
MW 223

14:15

Coin Talk
Featuring a collection of over 2500 individual coins and bills from over 80 countries, we will explore the inscribed cultural, political, and economic histories on international currencies. By seeing money through this lense, we can trace the evolution of economies and national attitudes of the people and governments as they have evolved over time.

Speakers
EG

EMILY GILBERT

Her current research revolves around issues related to citizenship, borders, security, economy, nation-states and globalization. She is particularly interested in the ways that North American geopolitical relations are being reshaped, and how the idea of risk—both economic and social—has... Read More →


Saturday February 11, 2017 14:15 - 15:45
MW 262

14:15

Grant Writing
Grant and proposal writing is a skill that is used in various academic and professional settings. Come learn from professionals in the non-profit, business and academic communities who have a wealth of experience writing, reviewing and consulting on grant writing. You will have the opportunity to learn about the best practices in the field and work on your writing skills that are targeted specifically to crafting effective grant applications, proposals and program design.

Speakers
RM

ROHIT MEHTA

Rohit Mehta is a lifelong Mississauga resident. Specializing in fundraising, he has served on the Grant Review Team of the Ontario Trillium Foundation for five years, and has been a professional grant writer, worked in donor relations, and sponsorship. He is a member of the Association... Read More →


Saturday February 11, 2017 14:15 - 15:45
MW 140

15:45

Buying Justice: Exploring Fair Trade and the Meaning Behind the Mark

As one brand or another, we have all seen Fair Trade at some point in our lives. Whether it marks our favourite coffee, artisanal handicrafts at retail outlets, or fresh produce at our super markets, Fair Trade is readily available for our purchase. However, the actual meaning of the Fair Trade logo may be as diverse as the products it labels. Fair Trade producer cooperatives, institutions, businesses, and consumers each have unique frameworks of understanding, applying, and maintaining the integrity of the Fair Trade mark. For us as consumers of these products, it is worth our time to explore the diversity of meaning behind the Fair Trade mark and different ways of interpreting and incorporating fair practices into business. So, in honour of UTSC being certified as  Canada’s 15th Fair Trade Campus by Fair Trade Canada, the IDC 2017 will set out to explore the complexities of ‘fairness’ and Fair Trade. Together, with a host of Toronto businesses, academics, and Canadian Fair Trade representatives we will explore the diversity of meanings behind Fair Trade, the applicability of it as a business model in Toronto, and what ‘fair’ means to us as everyday consumers.



Speakers
avatar for JOSE ABAD-PUELLES

JOSE ABAD-PUELLES

Jose Abad-Puelles was formerly the Category and Supply Chain Specialist for Coffee at Fairtrade Canada and now presently serves as the Coffee Account Manager for Canada. Jose was raised in a small farm in Northern Peru; there, he experienced all the challenges and struggles that small... Read More →
NH

NADIA HARDUAR

Nadia Harduar is the Sustainability Project Coordinator at the University of Toronto Scarborough with a Master of Environmental Science Degree. She is the Chair of the Sustainability Food User Sub Committee and worked alongside the Business Development Office and SCSU over the last... Read More →
DR

DR.DARRYL REED

Dr. Reed is Associate Professor of Business and Society Program for York University, and held teaching positions at several other universities. Dr. Reed has a wide range of research interests in the field of Business and Society, including corporate governance, community economic... Read More →
avatar for DEREK ZAVISLAKE

DEREK ZAVISLAKE

Derek Zavislake, co-founder of Merchants of Green Coffee with his brother Brad, is obsessed with delivering the freshest cup of coffee possible. The 20-year-old Toronto company imports and markets premium unroasted coffee beans from farmers around the world for consumers and some... Read More →



Saturday February 11, 2017 15:45 - 17:45
MW 120

15:45

Saviour Complex: Navigating Religion's Messy History and Current Role in Development
Religious institutions have a messy and complicated history in development. Today, many development practitioners and institutions continue to be based in religion - but not without tension.  Churches, mosques and other religious institutions are often the best positioned to know a community’s needs and respond accordingly. Local religious groups have the respect and recognition in the community that other development organizations spend years and even decades trying to achieve. Yet religious development organizations can also find themselves in a difficult tension between development and religion when the two seem to be in opposition, causing many to throw religion out of development practice indefinitely. Where does religion sit within the field of development? When does it act as a barrier, when is it the only open door to lifting people out of poverty, and how do development practitioners navigate between the two?

Moderators
PK

PAUL KINGSTON

Director, Centre for Critical Development Studies | Associate Professor, University of TorontoPaul Kingston is interested in the politics and power that underpin the dynamics of development and/or underdevelopment. He approaches this from the discipline of political science but with... Read More →

Speakers
JF

JESSICA FERNE

Director of Programs, International Development and Relief Foundation
DK

DR.DAVID KUPP

Program Coordinator, Master of Theological Studies in Development | Professor, Wycliffe CollegeDavid has been teaching courses at Wycliffe College since 2009, and is Director of the Urban and International Development program. He is also senior partner at Kabisa International and... Read More →
DM

DR.KATHERINE MARSHALL

Katherine Marshall is a senior fellow at the Berkley Center for Religion, Peace, and World Affairs, where she leads the Center's program on Religion and Global Development, and Professor of the Practice of Development, Conflict, and Religion at Georgetown University. After a long... Read More →
JC

JOSE CARLOS PREM

Country Director, Compassion Guatemala



Saturday February 11, 2017 15:45 - 17:45
MW 140

15:45

The Fist and the Gavel: Legal and Political Routes for the Advancement of Human Rights
Since the Second World War, international human rights have been codified into treaties that are nearly universally ratified. Regional courts and other international institutions have emerged to interpret and attempt to enforce these treaties. Despite these structures and laws, widely recognized civil and political human rights continue to be violated throughout the world, and social, cultural and economic rights remain unenforced. As an alternative, political mobilization has taken precedence as the tool to defend and enhance fundamental rights throughout the world, calling into question the efficacy of the human rights regime as an avenue for development. In The Fist and Gavel, the IDC 2017 will compare and contrast political mobilization and legal tactics as means to development with a focus on how local students may engage in these levels to defend the human right to development abroad.

Speakers
FD

FANTA DIABY

Fanta was born in Guinea but raised a little bit everywhere. Before moving to Canada, she had visited a number of African countries and lived a little bit of a transient childhood living in Guinea, Rwanda, Tanzania and Ghana. As a result, Fanta gained an interest in conflict and development... Read More →
PT

PHILIPPE TREMBLAY

Philippe Tremblay is a Senior Legal Advisor at Lawyers without Borders Canada (LWBC). Prior to holding this position, he served LWBC first as Colombia Program Officer and then Legal Director. Before joining LWBC, Philippe Tremblay worked for the Geneva-based Association for the Prevention... Read More →
CW

CORY WANLESS

Cory Wanless is a lawyer at Klippensteins Barristers and Solicitors in Toronto. Cory represents clients nationally and internationally in the areas of corporate accountability, First Nations rights, environmental law, defamation and affordable housing.Along with Murray Klippenstein... Read More →



Saturday February 11, 2017 15:45 - 17:45
MW 160

18:00

Gala

In partnership with OCIC, IDC Development Drinks will give delegates the opportunity to network with speakers and other special guests in a more intimate space. The first hour will consist of a facilitated networking session (speed-dating style), while the second hour will consist of performances, and freestyle mix and mingling. There will be an array of appetizers and non-alcoholic "mocktails". IDC Speed Networking is happening Sat, Feb. 11, 6-8 PM in the Environmental and Chemistry Building Atrium at University of Toronto Scarborough.



Saturday February 11, 2017 18:00 - 23:15
HW 305
 
Sunday, February 12
 

09:00

Registration and Breakfast
Sunday February 12, 2017 09:00 - 09:45
TBA

09:30

All that Glitters: Gold Mining, Mercury Pollution, and ASGM Communities

No other metal that has captured the attention of man more than gold. Throughout history gold has served as currency benchmarks, circuits in modern electronics, and symbols of enduring love. However, artisanal gold mining (AGM) represents a stark and present reminder of the cost for this precious metal. AGM actives heavily rely on the use of mercury, a potent neurotoxin, for gold extraction. International institutions, non-governmental organizations, and academic institutions have stepped up to provide national and international organization, technical intervention, and scientific research into the ASGM sector. In spite of this, the impact of mercury exposure on the estimated 12-15 million artisanal gold miners and the full scope of global mercury pollution are still not fully understood. Together with a panel of artisanal gold mining experts, environmental and social NGO’s, and environmental health scientists, the IDC 2017 will discuss the current state of artisanal gold mining, the scope and impact of mercury pollution, and the effectiveness of technical and legal interventions in reforming artisanal gold mining practices.

 


Moderators
JM

JIM MACLELLEN

For the past fifteen years, Jim has focused his attention on the identification and facilitation of sustainable human and environmental future. He has a broad background in ecology, sociology and economics, as well as a proficiency in computational procedures relating to, optimization... Read More →

Speakers
DB

DR.BRIDGET BERGQUIST

The primary aim of her research program is to increase our understanding of the biogeochemical cycles that are important for life on Earth and how these cycles have evolved over time through the use of trace metal and stable isotope geochemistry. Besides the inherent importance of... Read More →
JC

JACK CARAVANOS

Jack Caravanos currently serves as both the Director of Research for Pure Earth/Blacksmith Institute and as an Associate Professor of Environmental Public Health at Hunter College. Carrying only a few hand-held machines in his backpack, he travels to remote areas of Zambia, Indonesia... Read More →
AL

ANGELA LI-MULLER

Adjunct Professor with the Dalla Lana School of Public Health at the University of TorontoDr. Angela Li-Muller specializes in environmental health and regulatory toxicology, evaluating the impact on human health from exposures to chemicals from air, water, or soil. Over the years... Read More →
PR

PETER ROSENBLUTH, MSC.

Professor Emeritus, University of Toronto | Senior Fellow, Global Cities InstitutePeter is a results based management specialist as well as an environment and development specialist with over a decade of experience working for non-profit organizations in Canada and Southeast Asia... Read More →



Sunday February 12, 2017 09:30 - 11:30
MW 160

09:30

Crowding In: Responding to Poverty in Urban Slums around the World
The unprecedented rise of global urban poverty is a pressing issue facing development scholars and practitioners alike. The deplorable conditions in crowded slums are a unique context for development practitioners, policy makers, and urban planners, with new and particular challenges to overcome. How does the urban slum context complicate or simplify development programs’ attempts to achieve development outcomes, especially as outlined in Sustainable Development Goal #11? What needs to be done to mitigate the overwhelming problems of inadequate shelter and poor sanitation in urban slums? Most importantly, how can cities in the Global South continue to develop in ways that protect its most vulnerable citizens from the conditions in urban slums that seem to only mount their poverty? These are pressing questions whose answers have far-reaching implications into the lives of billions of city dwellers worldwide.

Moderators
RR

RAJ REDDY

Professor, Department of Human Geography, University of Toronto

Speakers
DC

DR.GUO CHEN

Guo is an Associate Professor of Geography and Global Urban Studies at MSU. She is a recipient of the MSU-ISS Teaching Award in 2010. She has published over thirty articles, book chapters, and an edited book. Guo’s research activities focus on the dynamics, spatial manifestations... Read More →
AK

ACHILLES KALLERGIS

Achilles Kallergis is a Research Scholar in the NYU Urban Expansion program. He is also a doctoral candidate in Public and Urban Policy and teaches at the Graduate Program for International Affairs at the New School University. His research interests include urbanization in the developing... Read More →
DS

DR.RICHARD STREN

Richard Stren is Emeritus Professor of Political Science, and Senior Fellow at the Global Cities Institute. His major area of interest is comparative urban policy with a special interest in developing countries. Professor Stren is a member of the editorial advisory board of five international... Read More →



Sunday February 12, 2017 09:30 - 11:30
MW 140

09:30

Legalizing Sustainable Business: Trade and the Environment

The international movement of goods and commercial activity is governed by a rich body of private and public international law. With a focus on reducing barriers to commerce, this body of laws has largely overlooked the effects of increasing international commerce on the environment. Increasingly, international development treaties have been centered around the principle of sustainability, the ability to develop without reducing the ability of future generations to do so as well. As action to mitigate climate change increases in urgency and necessity, reforms to the governance of international trade and commerce are required in order to implement the necessary policies to mitigate climate change. In Legalizing Sustainable Business, the IDC 2017 will gage the principle of sustainability in the governance of international trade, and potential improvements to the governance of international commerce that could further integrate environmental protection in international commerce.



Moderators
Speakers
avatar for FREEDOM KAI-PHILLIPS

FREEDOM KAI-PHILLIPS

BSc honors (E. Michigan), MA (Seton Hall), LLB (Dalhousie), LLM (Ottawa), is a Research Associate with the International Law Research Program (ILRP) at the Centre for International Governance Innovation (CIGI), a Legal Research Fellow with the Centre for International Sustainable... Read More →
avatar for SARA SECK

SARA SECK

Sara L Seck is an Associate professor at the Faculty of Law, Western University, in London, Ontario, and a Senior Fellow with the International Law Research Program of the Centre for International Governance Innovation in Waterloo, Ontario. Together with Neil Craik, she co-directs... Read More →
avatar for CONNER TIDD

CONNER TIDD

Mr. Connor Tidd, M.Sc candidate (University of Toronto), BA (McGill), is a current graduate student with the University of Toronto’s Institute for Management and Innovation in the Masters of Sustainability Management program and the Senior Strategy and Innovation Officer for the... Read More →



Sunday February 12, 2017 09:30 - 11:30
MW 120

11:30

Lunch
Check back soon for details! 

Sunday February 12, 2017 11:30 - 13:30
MW Atrium

11:45

Trade Fair
Trade Fair Exhibitors: 
 

International Development and Relief Foundation
IDRF (International Development and Relief Foundation) is a Canadian registered charitable organization dedicated to empowering the disadvantaged people of the world. IDRF provides effective humanitarian aid and sustainable development programs, without discrimination, based on the Islamic principles of human dignity, self-reliance, and social justice. www.IDRF.com

Mennonite Central Committe
Mennonite Central Committee (MCC) is a charitable organization that partners with churches and community organizations worldwide to walk with people who are disadvantaged. We work in partnership in order to meet local needs with local solutions. MCC supports activities in the areas of relief, development and peacebuilding that provide emergency assistance, reduce poverty, and promote healthy communities, sustainable living and alternatives to violence.  It is a ministry of Anabaptist churches in Canada and the U.S. which includes Mennonites and Brethren in Christ denominations. www.mcccanada.ca

Compassion Canada
As one of the world’s leading child development organizations, Compassion partners with the local church in 26 countries to end poverty in the lives of children and their families. Today, more than 1.7 million children and their families are discovering lives full of promise and purpose as they develop in all aspects of their lives – minds, bodies and relationships – while discovering God’s love for them in the gospel of Jesus Christ. www.compassion.ca

Fair Trade Toronto
Fair Trade Toronto (FTT) is an independent, volunteer based organization. We promote Fair Trade in the City of Toronto and unify the Fair Trade community in the GTA to increase public awareness. We are also part of a greater Fair Trade organization (Fair Trade Canada) that allows us to connect with the national and international community.

http://fairtradetoronto.ca/about-us/


Results Canada
RESULTS Canada is a global movement of passionate citizens, committed to raising our voices for a world without extreme poverty. We combine the voices of our grassroots advocates with strategic advocacy efforts to leverage millions of dollars for programs and improved policies that give the world’s poorest people the health, education, and opportunity they need to thrive.

https://www.results-resultats.ca/en/

Undercurrent
International Development students are unique: their daily studies are, in base form, explorations of the most daunting challenges the world has ever faced. The questions faced by these individuals are immense; their ability to find answers to them will be pivotal. Entirely student-run, The Undercurrent exists to help Canadian students find those answers. Our flagship peer-reviewed journal publishes the best of undergraduate student writing, and publicizes the student perspective for the academic and practitioner communities.

http://undercurrentjournal.ca/


Hearty Catering
Hearty Catering has been "green" from our beginnings; our use of locally grown and organic food is a major component in creating our delicious cuisine. We are proud to feature the wholesome bounty of local farmers and producers in all our menus. By doing so, we have proven that delicious flavours and good nutrition result from a commitment to supporting local producers and a sustainable food chain. We choose local, organic, seasonal produce whenever possible. We adhere to a code of preparing only naturally and sustainably-raised meats and sourced seafoods. We select our ingredients from local farms and suppliers who emphasize organic and sustainable offerings. Our business practices have been affirmed by our certifications by the Coalition for Canadian Farm Animals, Local Food Plus, and Leaders in Environmentally Accountable Food Service (Level II) and the Ontario Culinary Tourist Association's Feast ON program. Our commitment is to offer nourishing, delicious cuisine that contributes to sustainable food systems and healthy communities.

http://heartycatering.com


Aga Khan
Established in 1980, AKFC is a registered Canadian charity and an agency of the worldwide Aga Khan Development Network, a group of development agencies with individual mandates that address social, economic and cultural dimensions of development. Active in 30 countries, these agencies share a mission to improve living conditions and opportunities for the poor, without regard to their faith, origin or gender.


Equity and Diversity Office, UTSC
In cooperation with its campus partners, the EDO promotes an equitable and inclusive campus community, free from discrimination or harassment based on age, disability, race, ancestry, place of origin, colour, ethnic origin, citizenship, creed, sex, gender expression, gender identity, sexual orientation, family status, marital status, and / or record of offences.


International Students Centre, UTSC
The International Student Centre at UTSC will be promoting student opportunities for international internships.



Sunday February 12, 2017 11:45 - 13:30
TBA

13:30

All that Glitters: Gold Mining, Mercury Pollution, and ASGM Communities
No other metal that has captured the attention of man more than gold. Throughout history gold has served as currency benchmarks, circuits in modern electronics, and symbols of enduring love. However, artisanal gold mining (AGM) represents a stark and present reminder of the cost for this precious metal. AGM actives heavily rely on the use of mercury, a potent neurotoxin, for gold extraction. International institutions, non-governmental organizations, and academic institutions have stepped up to provide national and international organization, technical intervention, and scientific research into the ASGM sector. In spite of this, the impact of mercury exposure on the estimated 12-15 million artisanal gold miners and the full scope of global mercury pollution are still not fully understood. Together with a panel of artisanal gold mining experts, environmental and social NGO’s, and environmental health scientists, the IDC 2017 will discuss the current state of artisanal gold mining, the scope and impact of mercury pollution, and the effectiveness of technical and legal interventions in reforming artisanal gold mining practices.

Moderators
JM

JIM MACLELLEN

For the past fifteen years, Jim has focused his attention on the identification and facilitation of sustainable human and environmental future. He has a broad background in ecology, sociology and economics, as well as a proficiency in computational procedures relating to, optimization... Read More →

Speakers
DB

DR.BRIDGET BERGQUIST

The primary aim of her research program is to increase our understanding of the biogeochemical cycles that are important for life on Earth and how these cycles have evolved over time through the use of trace metal and stable isotope geochemistry. Besides the inherent importance of... Read More →
JC

JACK CARAVANOS

Jack Caravanos currently serves as both the Director of Research for Pure Earth/Blacksmith Institute and as an Associate Professor of Environmental Public Health at Hunter College. Carrying only a few hand-held machines in his backpack, he travels to remote areas of Zambia, Indonesia... Read More →
AL

ANGELA LI-MULLER

Adjunct Professor with the Dalla Lana School of Public Health at the University of TorontoDr. Angela Li-Muller specializes in environmental health and regulatory toxicology, evaluating the impact on human health from exposures to chemicals from air, water, or soil. Over the years... Read More →
PR

PETER ROSENBLUTH, MSC.

Professor Emeritus, University of Toronto | Senior Fellow, Global Cities InstitutePeter is a results based management specialist as well as an environment and development specialist with over a decade of experience working for non-profit organizations in Canada and Southeast Asia... Read More →



Sunday February 12, 2017 13:30 - 15:30
MW 160

13:30

Crowding In: Responding to Poverty in Urban Slums around the World
The unprecedented rise of global urban poverty is a pressing issue facing development scholars and practitioners alike. The deplorable conditions in crowded slums are a unique context for development practitioners, policy makers, and urban planners, with new and particular challenges to overcome. How does the urban slum context complicate or simplify development programs’ attempts to achieve development outcomes, especially as outlined in Sustainable Development Goal #11? What needs to be done to mitigate the overwhelming problems of inadequate shelter and poor sanitation in urban slums? Most importantly, how can cities in the Global South continue to develop in ways that protect its most vulnerable citizens from the conditions in urban slums that seem to only mount their poverty? These are pressing questions whose answers have far-reaching implications into the lives of billions of city dwellers worldwide.

Speakers
DG

DR. GUO CHEN

Guo is an Associate Professor of Geography and Global Urban Studies at MSU. She is a recipient of the MSU-ISS Teaching Award in 2010. She has published over thirty articles, book chapters, and edited numerous books. Guo’s research activities focus on the dynamics, spatial manifestations... Read More →
AK

ACHILLES KALLERGIS

Achilles Kallergis is a Research Scholar in the NYU Urban Expansion program. He is also a doctoral candidate in Public and Urban Policy and teaches at the Graduate Program for International Affairs at the New School University. His research interests include urbanization in the developing... Read More →
DS

DR.RICHARD STREN

Richard Stren is Emeritus Professor of Political Science, and Senior Fellow at the Global Cities Institute. His major area of interest is comparative urban policy with a special interest in developing countries. Professor Stren is a member of the editorial advisory board of five international... Read More →


Sunday February 12, 2017 13:30 - 15:30
MW 140

13:30

Legalizing Sustainable Business: Trade and the Environment
The international movement of goods and commercial activity is governed by a rich body of private and public international law. With a focus on reducing barriers to commerce, this body of laws has largely overlooked the effects of increasing international commerce on the environment. Increasingly, international development treaties have been centered around the principle of sustainability, the ability to develop without reducing the ability of future generations to do so as well. As action to mitigate climate change increases in urgency and necessity, reforms to the governance of international trade and commerce are required in order to implement the necessary policies to mitigate climate change. In Legalizing Sustainable Business, the IDC 2017 will gage the principle of sustainability in the governance of international trade, and potential improvements to the governance of international commerce that could further integrate environmental protection in international commerce.

Moderators
Speakers
avatar for FREEDOM KAI-PHILLIPS

FREEDOM KAI-PHILLIPS

BSc honors (E. Michigan), MA (Seton Hall), LLB (Dalhousie), LLM (Ottawa), is a Research Associate with the International Law Research Program (ILRP) at the Centre for International Governance Innovation (CIGI), a Legal Research Fellow with the Centre for International Sustainable... Read More →
avatar for SARA SECK

SARA SECK

Sara L Seck is an Associate professor at the Faculty of Law, Western University, in London, Ontario, and a Senior Fellow with the International Law Research Program of the Centre for International Governance Innovation in Waterloo, Ontario. Together with Neil Craik, she co-directs... Read More →
avatar for CONNER TIDD

CONNER TIDD

Mr. Connor Tidd, M.Sc candidate (University of Toronto), BA (McGill), is a current graduate student with the University of Toronto’s Institute for Management and Innovation in the Masters of Sustainability Management program and the Senior Strategy and Innovation Officer for the... Read More →



Sunday February 12, 2017 13:30 - 15:30
MW 120

15:45

Closing Keynote by Jacqueline Stein
Jacqueline holds a Master's Degree in International Communications and Development from City University London and has spent the past several years living and working abroad with a diverse roster of international organizations and start-up enterprises. Her work has taken her throughout Canada, the United States, Brazil, Austria, India, and Zambia, and she has traveled extensively in East, West, and South Africa. Jacqueline's mantra is 'so long as we live in this world, we have a responsibility to it'. She is passionate about human rights issues, particularly as it pertains to the livelihoods of women and children, and stimulating economic growth through responsible business.

Speakers
JS

Jacqueline Sten

acqueline holds a Master's Degree in International Communications and Development from City, University of London and has spent the past several years living and working abroad with a diverse roster of international organizations and start-up enterprises. Her work has taken her throughout... Read More →



Sunday February 12, 2017 15:45 - 16:45
MW 170

16:45

Closing Remarks
Sunday February 12, 2017 16:45 - 17:15
TBA